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IHSMarkitGermanMarketReview2020

Germany: Looking Ahead to the 2021 AGM Season Through an ESG Lensihsmarkit.com/corporate Executive Summary The phrase expect the unexpected accurately describes the happenings of the 2020 Annual General Meeting season. This year has seen companies trying to navigate their way through a global pandemic, with workforces being forced to abandon their offices and work from home, large organisations suffering unexpected losses, and national lockdowns that have impacted not just balance sheets but als IHS Markit , companies for which climate , boards to be climate , germany through an esg , companies and their shareholders , elections at several german , companies , supervisory board elections , german companies , board , annual general meeting season , investors , supervisory board , german , key superviso 31-Jan-2021 auto-generated
WEFUSA_DirectInvestingInstitutionalInvestors

Direct Investing by Institutional Investors: Implications for Investors and Policy-Makers Prepared in collaboration with Oliver Wyman November 2014 World Economic Forum 2014 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, including photocopying and recording, or by any information storage and retrieval system. Direct Investing by Institutional Investors | B Contents Preface 1 2 3 Preface Executive Summary 1. The Investor Ecosystem 4 WEF , investors without the governance , invests in a fund , assets such as real , partner are still direct , assets across all real , managers by us pension , owners and their asset , investors to also invest , manager if the institution , institutions but their managers , assets are in illiquid , fund 2-Feb-2021 auto-generated
WEF_Cyber_Resilience_Playbook

Future of Digital Economy and Society System Initiative Cyber Resilience Playbook for Public- Private Collaboration In collaboration with The Boston Consulting Group January 2018 Contents Preface 1. Introduction 2. Using the Playbook for Public-Private Collaboration 3. Reference architecture for public-private collaboration 4. Policy models 4.1 Zero-days 4.2 Vulnerability liability 4.3 Attribution 4.4 Research, data, and intelligence sharing 4.5 Botnet disruption 4.6 Monitoring 4.7 Assigning nat WEF , model as more companies , state of the active , capabilities to the private , privacy should be limited , choices on five key , privacy will be limited , companies in the private , user and a technology , privacy and the limited , defence in most cases , sharing between the public , risks associat 2-Feb-2021 auto-generated